Archive

1935


“‘Tis Sweet To Be Remembered”; The Hilltoppers; Tom, Don and Ernie; Conqueror (8747); November 1, 1935



“ON TREASURE ISLAND”; Chick Bullock; Leslie; Burke; Perfect (6-01-01); November 1, 1935



“RED SAILS IN THE SUNSET”; Chick Bullock; Kennedy; Williams; Perfect (6-01-01); November 1, 1935


The New York Times, November 1, 1935


“THERE’S AN OLD FAMILY ALBUM IN THE PARLOR”; Jimmie and Eddie Dean; Melotone (7-02-57); November 1, 1935


“Haunted House Blues”; Bessie Smith; J. C. Johnson; Columbia (14010-D); Publication date: 1924


“Haunted Town”; Lena Horne with Charlie Barnet and his Orchestra; Nigel Altman; Alec Fogarty; Bluebird (30-0823-B); Publication date: January 7, 1941


“The House is Haunted”; Ramona; the Park Avenue Boys; Billy Rose; Basil G. Adlam; Victor (24597-A); Publication date:March 27, 1934


The New York Times, October 31, 1935


“The Haunted House Boogie”; MGM (10877-A); Publication date: 1951


“Roll Along Prairie Moon”; Praire Ramblers; Fio Rito; MacPherson; Von Tilzer; Conqueror (8609); Publication date: October 30, 1935


“THE NIGHTMARE”; Clyde McCoy and his Orchestra; Len Riley; Billy Meyers; Al Handler; Decca (681 A); Publication date: October 14, 1935


“The Nightmare Is Over”; Eddie Boyd And His Chessmen; E. Boyd; Chess (1595); 1955


“NIGHTMARE BLUES”; TINY GRIMES QUINTET; Red Prysock; Prysock; Grimes; Atlantic (869); Publication date: August 1, 1948


The New York Times, October 30, 1935


“NIGHTMARE BLUES”; HAZEL SCOTT; Hazel Scott; Scott; Columbia (37999); Publication date: October 1947


“Alone”; Hal Kemp and his Orchestra; Maxine Grey; Freed; Brown; Brunswick (7552); Publication date: October 29, 1935


“Don’t Mention Love To Me”; Johnny Johnson and his Orchestra; Vi Mele; Fields; Levant; Perfect (6-01-03); Publication date: October 29, 1935


The New York Times, October 29, 1935


“It’s Dangerous to Love Like This”; Hal Kemp and his Orchestra; Maxine Grey; Seymour; Lawnhurst; Brunswick (7552); Publication date: October 29, 1935


“WAH-HOO!”; Hoosier Hot Shots; Cliff Friend; Conqueror (8635); Publication date: October 28, 1935


The New York Times, October 28, 1935


“Pick That Bass”; Hoosier Hot Shots; Al and Gertrude Bernard; Melotone (7-04-62); Publication date: October 28, 1935


The New York Post, October 28, 1935 ($350 had the same buying power as $7,008 in September 2021.)


“THEM HILL-BILLIES ARE MOUNTAIN-WILLIAMS NOW”; Hoosier Hot Shots; Cavanaugh; Sanford; Mysels; Conqueror (8635); Publication date: October 28, 1935


“I May Be Wrong”; Chick Webb and his Orchestra, Taft Jordan; October 1935


The New York Times, October 27, 1935


“I Feel Like A Feather In The Breeze”; Hal Kemp and his Orchestra; Gordon; Revel; Skinny Ennis; Brunswick (7553); October 1935


The New York Times, October 27, 1935 (There were approximately 319 homicides in NYC in 2019.)


“I LIVE FOR LOVE”; Original Dixieland Jazz Band; Russ Morgan; Dixon; Wrubel; Vocalion (3084); October 1935


“I Found a Dream”; Ozzie Nelson and his Orchestra; Ozzie Nelson; Hartman; Gorney; Brunswick (7549); October 1935


“I’m a Gambler”; Jimmie Dorsey and his Orchestra; Bob Eberle; Monaco; Leslie; Decca (607 A); October 1935


The New York Times, October 25, 1935


“I Don’t Know Your Name (But You’re Beautiful)”; Ozzie Nelson and his Orchestra; Ozzie Nelson; Caesar; Lerner; Marks; Brunswick (7549); October 1935

Frank Yale: 1893-1928, (35)
Jack Diamond: 1897-1931, (33)
Vincent Coll: 1908-1932, (23)
Charles Higgins: 1897-1932, (34)
Larry Fay: 1888-1933, (44)
Clyde Barrow: 1909–1934, (24)
Bonnie Parker: 1910–1934, (22)
John Dillinger: 1903-1934, (32)
Homer Van Meter: 1905-1934, (35)
Charles Floyd: 1904-1934, (30)
George Nelson: 1908-1934, (25)
Joseph Amberg: 1892-1935, (43)
Louis Amberg: 1897-1935, (36)
Dutch Schultz: 1901-1935, (34)


“I’VE GOT A FEELIN’ YOU’RE FOOLIN'”; ARCHIE BLEYER and his ORCHESTRA; Durelle Alexander; Freed; Brown; Banner (35-10-22 A); October 1935



The New York Times, October 26, 1935


Allison, “Transcript of Death Bed Statements Made by Schultz“, The New York Times, October 26, 1935

Transcript of Death Bed Statements Made by Schultz

Statements made by Arthur (Dutch Schultz) Flegenheimer were taken down by a Newark police stenographer, F. J. Lang. The notes covered the period from about 4 o’clock Thursday afternoon until Schultz died. During that period he was delirious most of the time, but lucid at intervals. A transcript of all he said follows:

George, don’t make no full moves. What have you done with him? Oh, mama, mama, mama. Oh stop it, stop it; oh, oh, oh. Sure, sure, mama.

(Schultz at this time was irrational, suffering with a fever of 106 degrees. Sergeant Luke Conlon and other detectives from Newark police headquarters and from the Prosecutor’s office were at his bedside. One of the officers had a newspaper. Schultz noticed newspapers and said “Has it been. In any other papers?”)

Now listen, Phil, fun is fun. Ah please, papa. What happened to the sixteen? Oh, oh, he done It. Please.

John, please oh, did you buy the hotel? You promised A million-sure. Get out, I wished I knew.

Please make it quick, fast and furious. Please. Fast and furious. Please help me get out: I am getting my wind back, thank God. Please, please, oh, please. You will have to please tell him, you got no case.

You get ahead with the dot dash system – didn’t I speak that time Iast night. Whose number is that in your pocket book, Phil 13780.

Who was it? Oh-please, please.

Mentions the Names Henry and Frankie

Reserve decision. Police, police, Henry and Frankie.

Oh, oh dog biscuits and when he is happy he doesn’t get snappy – please, please do this. Then Henry, Henry, Frankie you didn’t meet him, you didn’t even meet me. The glove will fit what I say oh, Kayiyi, oh Kayiyi. Sure who cares when you are through? How do you know this?

How do you know this? Well, then – oh, Cocoa know — thinks he is a grandpa again. He is jumping around. No Hobo and Poboe I think he means the same thing.

Questioned by Sergeant Conlon:
Q- Who shot you?
A.- The boss himself.
Q- He did?
A.- Yes, I don’t know.
Q.- What did he shoot you for?
A.- I showed him boss: did you hear him meet me? An appointment. Appeal stuck. All right, mother.
Q.- Was it the boss shot you?
A.- Who shot me? No one.
Q.- We will help you.
A.- Will you get me up? O.K. I won’t be such a big creep. Oh, mama, I can’t go through with lt, please. Oh – and then he clips me; come on. Cut that out, we don’t owe a nickel; hold it; instead, hold It against him; I am a pretty good pretzler – Winifred Department of Justice. I even got it from the department. Sir, please stop it. Say listen the – last night.

By Sergeant Conlon: Don’t holler.
A.- I don’t want to holler.

Says He Doesn’t Know Why He Was Shot

Q.- What did they shoot you for?
A.- I don’t know, sir, honestly I don’t. I don’t even know who was with me, honestly. I went to the toilet. I was in the toilet and when I reached the – the boy came at me.
Q.- The big fellow gave it to you?
A.- Yes, he gave it to me.
Q.- Do you know who this big fellow was?
A.- No.

If we wanted to break the ring no, please I get a month. They did it. Come on. —— (A name, not clear) cut me off and says you are not to be the beneficiary of this will. Is that right? I will be checked and double checked and please pull for me. Will you pull? How many good ones and how many bad ones? Please I had nothing with him he was a cowboy in one of the seven days a week fight. No business; no hangout; no friends, nothing; just what you pick up and what you need.

I don’t know who shot me.

Don’t put anyone ner this check; you might have – please do it for me. Let me get up, heh? In the olden days they waited and they waited. Please give me shot. It is from the factory. Sure, that is a bad – well, oh good ahead that happens for trying. I don’t want harmony. I want harmony. Oh, mamma, mamma! Who give it to him? Who give it to him? Let me in the district – fire – factory that he was nowhere near. It smoldered.

“Please Shift Me; Police Are Here”

No, no. There are only ten of us and there are 10,000,000 fighting somewhere of you, so get you onions up and we will throw up the truce flag. Oh, please let me up. Please shift me. Police Are here. Communistic … strike … baloney… honestly thlg Is a habit I get; sometimes I give it and sometimes I don’t. Oh, I am all in. That settles it. Are you sure? Please let me get in and eat. Let him harass himself to you and then bother you.

Please don’t ask me to go there. I don’t want to. I still don’t want him in the path. It is no use to stage a riot. The sidewalk was in trouble and the bears were in trouble and I broke it up. Please put me in that room. Please keep him in control. My gilt edge stuff and those dirty rats have tuned in. Please, mother, don’t tear, don’t rip; that is something that shouldn’t be spoken about. Please get me up, my friends. Please, look out, the shooting is a bit wild, and that kind of shooting saved a man’s life.

No payrolls. No walls. No coupons. That would be entirely out. Pardon me. I forgot I am a plaintiff and not defendant. Look out. Look out for him. Please. He owed me money: he owes everyone money. Why can’t he just pull out and give me control?

Please, mother, you pick me up now. Please, you know me.

No. Don’t you scare me. My friends and I think I do a better job. Police are looking for you all over. Be Instrumental in letting us know. They are English men and they are a type I don’t know who is best, they or us. Oh, sir, get the doll a roofing. You can play jacks and girls do that with a soft ball and do tricks with it. I take all events into consideration. No. No. And it is no. It is confused and its says no. A boy has never wept… nor dashed a thousand kim. Did you hear me?

Q.- (By Detective) – Who shot you?
A.- I don’t know.
Q.- The doctor wants you to be quiet.
A.- That is what I want to do.
Q. How many shots were fired?
A.- I don’t know.
Q.- How many?
A.- Two thousand. Come one, get some money in that treasury. We need it. Come on, please get it. I can’t tell you to. That Is not what you have in the book. Oh, please warden. What am I going to do for money? Please put me up on my feet at once. You are a hard boiled man. Did you hear me? I would hear it, the Circuit Court would hear it, and the Supreme Court might hear it. If that ain’t the pay-off. Please crack down on the Chinaman’s friends and Hitler’s commander. I am sore and I am going up and I am going to give you honey If I can. Mother is the best bet and don’t let Satan draw you too fast.
Q.- (By detective). What did the big fellow shoot you for?
A.- Him? John? Over a million, five million dollars.
Q.- You want to get well, don’t you?
A.- Yes.
Q.- Then lie quiet.
A.-Yes, I will lie quiet.

He Refers to John As Cause of Trouble

Q.- John shot and we will take care of John.
A.- That is what caused the trouble. Look out. Please get me up. If you do this, you can go on and jump right here in the lake. I know who they are. They are French people. All right. Look out, look out. Oh. my memory is gone. A work relief. Police. Who gets it? I don’t know and I don’t want to know, but look out. It can be traced. He changed for the worse. Please look out; my fortunes have changed and come back and went back since that. It was desperate. I am wobbly. You ain’t got nothing on him but we got it on his helper.

Q.- (By detective). Control yourself.
A.- But I am dying.
Q.- No, you are not.
A.- Come on, mama. All right, dear, you have to get it.

At this point, Schultz’s wife, Frances, was brought to his bedside. “She spoke.

Mrs. Schultz- This is Frances.

Schultz began to talk again, saying:
Then pull me out. I am half crazy. They won’t let me get up. They dyed my shoes. Open those shoes. Give me something. I am so sick. Give me some water, the only thing that I want. Open this up and break it so I can touch you. Dannie, pleases get me in the car.

At this point Mrs. Schultz left the room.

Sergeant Conlon questioned Schultz.again.

Q.- Who shot you?
A.- I don’t know. I didn’t even get a look. I don’t know who can have done it. Anybody.
Kindly take my shoes off.
(He was told that they were off.)

No, there is a handcuff on them. The Baron says these things.

I know what I am doing here with my collection of papers. It isn’t worth a nickel to two guys like you or me but to a collector it is worth a fortune. It is priceless. I am going to turn it over to…. Turn you back to me, please, Henry. I am so sick now. The police are getting many complaints. Look out. I want that G-note. Look out for Jimmy Valentine for he is an old pal of mine. Come on, come on, Jim. Ok, ok, I am all through. Can’t do another thing.

Look out, mamma, look out for her. You can’t beat him. Police. mamma, Helen, mother, please take me out. I will settle the indictment. Come on, open the soap duckets. The chimney sweeps. Talk to the sword. Shut up, you got a big mouth! Please help me up. Henny. Max, come over here. French-Canadian bean soup. I want to pay. Let them leave me alone.

Schultz sank into unconsciousness then. It was 6:40 PM. He died less than two hours later, without saying anything else.

The New York Times, October 26, 1935


The New York Times, October 26, 1935

888


The Sun, October 25, 1935, p.1

Schultz’s Last Statement

Delirious Gangster Says ‘the Boss’ Shot Him
-His Ravings, Made Public by Police,
Constitute Curious Document.

Words, names and fragments of sentences, spoken and shouted by Arthur (Dutch Schultz) Flegenheimer in the Newark City Hospital during two hours yesterday afternoon when his delirium was punctuated by short periods of lucidity, were made public by Newark police today. Notes of what Schultz said were taken by an official stenographer. The document, as made public by the police, read:

Statement by Arthur Flegenheimer, alias Dutch Schultz, in Newark City Hospital, on October 24, 4 P.M. to 6 P.M., from stenographic notes made by F.J. Long, stenographer of Newark Police Department:

The Sun, October 25, 1935, p.1


Allison, Schultz’s Last Statement by the Letter, The Sun, October 25, 1935, p.1


The Sun, October 25, 1935

000


“EENY MEENY MINEY MO”; Teddy Wilson; Billie Holiday; Mercer; Malneck; Brunswick (7554); Publication date: October 25, 1935


The New York Times, October 26, 1935


“Twenty Four Hours A Day”; Teddy Wilson; Billie Holiday; Publication date: October 25, 1935

GANGSTER’S WIDOW IS HELD

Mrs. Arthur (Dutch Schultz) Flegeneimer

The former night club hostess wept bitterly as she left the hospital after bidding final good-by to her dying husband. Mrs. Flegeneimer was held as a material witness after she admitted to police she was the woman who visited Schultz shortly before he was shot.

WAS SCHULTZ SHOT BY ONE OF HIS OWN MEN?

This reconstruction pf the scene of the Newark massacre shows how Ditch Schultz came into the direct line of fire of his own bodyguards as he left the washroom and started to return to his table. A .45 slug killed him; the raiding gunmen are belived to have used a shotgun and a machine gun. Schultz’s men toted .45s.


The New York Post, October 25, 1935


“IF YOU WERE MINE”; Teddy Wilson; Billie Holiday; Mercer; Malneck; Brunswick (7554); Publication date: October 25, 1935


(1) Continuous Machine Gun Burst; (2) Single Machine Gun Burst; (3) Single Machine Gun Burst; (4) Single Whistling Shell; (5) Single Whistling Shell; (5) Continuous Whistling Shells; Major (5010 A); 1960


Gun Battle Western (3 cuts); Standard Sound Effect (507A)


Gun Shots (5 cuts); Standard Sound Effect (507B)


(1) Continuous Machine Gun Burst; (2) Single Machine Gun Burst; (3) Single Machine Gun Burst; (4) Single Whistling Shell; (5) Single Whistling Shell; (5) Continuous Whistling Shells; Major (5010 A); 1960


Gun Battle Western (3 cuts); Standard Sound Effect (507A)


Gun Shots (5 cuts); Standard Sound Effect (507B)


The New York Times, October 24, 1935


(1) Continuous Machine Gun Burst; (2) Single Machine Gun Burst; (3) Single Machine Gun Burst; (4) Single Whistling Shell; (5) Single Whistling Shell; (5) Continuous Whistling Shells; Major (5010 A); 1960


Gun Battle Western (3 cuts); Standard Sound Effect (507A)

RACKET OVERLOAD FIGHTS FOR HIS LIFE

Arthur (Dutch Schultz) Flegenheimer

The sometime king of the racketeers as he lay in Newark City Hospital today, fighting against death. The bullet wound in his left breast is plainly visible. A mixture of fear and bewilderment is painted on his face and indicated by his fluttering hands.


Gun Shots (5 cuts); Standard Sound Effect (507B)


(1) Continuous Machine Gun Burst; (2) Single Machine Gun Burst; (3) Single Machine Gun Burst; (4) Single Whistling Shell; (5) Single Whistling Shell; (5) Continuous Whistling Shells; Major (5010 A); 1960


Gun Battle Western (3 cuts); Standard Sound Effect (507A)


Gun Shots (5 cuts); Standard Sound Effect (507B)


The New York Post, October 24, 1935

[(Weegee: 1899-1968; Dutch Schultz: 1901-1935; Great Depression: 1929–1933; Prohibition: 1920-1933; In October 1935, $827,253 had the same buying power as $16,563,778.86 in September 2021; $300 had the same buying power as $6,000; Palace Chop House and Tavern: 12 East Park St, Newark, NJ 07102; [Best Western Plus] Robert Treat Hotel: 50 Park Place, Newark, NJ 07102)]


(1) Continuous Machine Gun Burst; (2) Single Machine Gun Burst; (3) Single Machine Gun Burst; (4) Single Whistling Shell; (5) Single Whistling Shell; (5) Continuous Whistling Shells; Major (5010 A); 1960


“I Paid My Income Tax Today”; Dick Robertson And His Orchestra; Dick Robertson and The American Four; Irving Berlin; Decca (4151 A); 1942


“Luxury Tax Blues”; Eddie Vinson And His Orchestra; Eddie Vinson; Vinson; Robinson; Mercury (8051-B); 1947


“Taxpayers’ Blues”; Bulee Gaillard and his Southern Fried Orchestra; Carroll; Gaillard; Norman Granz; Mercury (8970); 1952


The New York Times, October 18, 1935


“Max from the Income Tax”; Sophie Tucker; Ted Shapiro; Bass; Kroll; Mercury (5839); 1952