Archive

1941







PM, June 18, 1941 (pages 1, 6, 7, 14, 15, 18)

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PM, June 17, 1941 (pages 1, 4, 8, 10, 11, 15, 19)

Nazi’s in New York, spying on New York harbor, “What the Mayor Did Yesterday,” “No Witch-Hunting…”… (photos by Morris Gordon, John DeBiase. Ray Platnick, etc…)


PM, August 27, 1941


PM, September 9, 1941, p. 18

Happy Weegee’s Birthday Day… (Weegee, born June 12, 1899…)

In the past: above, a pair highlights from 1941… (two and three months in the future…)
Below, if it was 1941 we could go to the theater… And see: Boris Karloff in “the maddest and funniest play you’ve ever seen” or Ethel Barrymore in “The Corn is Green” or Katherine Cornell in “The Doctor’s Dilemma” or Orson Welles’ production of Richard Wright’s “Native Son” or the 700th performance of “The Man Who Came for Dinner”…

(In the present: it’s kinda a golden age of Weegee publications. The last few years have seen a number of great books, including: “Murder is My Business” (2013), “Weegee Guide to NYC” (2015), “Weegee: Serial Photographer” (2016-17), “Extra! Weegee” (2017), “Artist as Reporter Weegee, Ad Reinhardt, and the PM News Picture” (2018), and most recently “Flash: The Making of Weegee the Famous” (2018)… And a video for National Geographic: “Weegee the Famous” (2016)… Onward…)


PM, June 12, 1941, p. 24



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PM, May 19, 1941, pages 1, 5, 9, 12

“7 Pages: Are Prices Going Up?”

“U.S.A. Is Warned…”

Ten Firemen Overcome in Washington Market Blaze
“Joe Balierwalter was just one of 10 firemen overcome while fighting a smoky blaze in the heart of Washington Market early today. The fire started in the basement of a three-story brick building occupied by Kraemer & Klie, banana dealers, at 373 Washington St. The firemen had a tough enough time getting their apparatus past the numerous trucks and drays that clog the market. But when they got into the cellar, they dropped like flies as 400 crates of bananas, wrapped in wet straw and burlap, threw off carbon monoxide gas. All the firemen were revived. PM Photo by Weegee.

Ickes Calls for All-Out Aid in Talk to City’s Biggest Crowd
“…Secretary of the Interior, was cheered by the largest audience ever assembled in New York when he called for all-out aid to Britain in the fight to save democracy…”
I Am an American Program Drew 750,000 to Central Park Mall.”
“Mayor LaGuardia wielded the baton.”
Photos by Gene Badger, PM


PM, May 18, 1941

“What Are We Going To Do About It?”
Abraham Reles… (Murder, Inc.)
Artists don’t live in the Village anymore…
Aquarium may move to Coney Island…
Governors Island… (photos by Alan Fisher)
“New York Enjoying Spring Fever,” Hippos (Rosie and Schlemiel), etc. (Great series of photos by M. Engel)
New Citizens Day: Alexandra Tolstoy, “daughter of Russian author Leo Tolstoy…” (photos by Gene Badger)
Weather Photography, edited by Ralph Steiner…
International Society for Contemporary Music… (icsm.org)
Re. Utah Smith at MoMA… (photo by Irving Haberman) (Rev. Utah Smith on The Hound Blog)


screenshot from moma.org

“The fourth program in the series of Coffee Concerts at the Museum of Modern Art will be Jubilee, a Negro revival meeting, on Wednesday evening, May 21, at nine. The prayer meeting and “anniversary,” complete with gospel singers and elocutionist, will be led by the Reverend Utah Smith, evangelist, as master of ceremonies. The Reverend Smith delivers his religious messages with the aid of an electrical guitar. Some of his preaching is extemporaneous; some is part of his original repertoire. His theme song is “I Got Two Wings.”
He has preached as an itinerant evangelist for twenty years, mostly in the south where “folks is more church goin’ than Northerners.” Louise Crane, who has arranged the Coffee Concerts for the Museum, first heard the Reverend Smith in a small church in Newark and invited him to participate in the series. Appearing with him are twelve singers, members of his flock in Newark…” (pdf: moma.org)


PM, May 16, p. 15, “1001 Afternoons in New York” by Ben Hecht

Murder in Broome Street
Let’s have a love story for a change.
There’s a dearth of amour in the press these days that gives you a lopsided picture of our town…
We’ll pick up our heroine (as they say in Hollywood) in Room 29 of the Hotel Commercial. This is a stained and giddy inn at the corner of Broome St. and the Bowery…”

(Commercial Hotel, 341 Broome, CAnal 6-9165, across the street from the Spring Arrows Social and Athletic Club, 344 Broome, site of “Off Duty Cop Does Duty, Kills Gunman Who Tries Stickup,” February 3, 1942.)



NY Times, March 31, 1966 (Pioneer Hotel, 341 Broome)