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PM, March 12, 1942, p.5

Police Seize 3 Suspects in the Refuge Murder Case

“A wealthy Polish refugee, Mrs. Susan Flora Reich, suffocated last week when robbers bound and gagged her after stripping her of $2000 in jewelry. Her body was found in an East Side hotel apartment occupied by Madeline Webb, former model, and Eli Shonbrun. Third suspect, John D. Cullen, above, right, is watching Miss Webb climb into a patrol wagon. Evidence against the trio will be presented to a grand jury tomorrow. Assistant DA said Miss Reich was killed in a “barbarous, inhuman and savage attack.” In court, Miss Webb screamed: “You can’t do this to me!”

“Mullen represented himself as the father-in-law of Miss Webb in renting a Bronx furnished room. Here he is being booked for homicide. Police trailed him for two days before arresting him and getting information that led to the others. PM Photo by Hy Rothman

“Shonbrun drummed his fingers nervously on desk while giving pedigree. Miss Webb tried to hide her face from photographers. She came here from Stillwater, Okla, is a college graduate, worked as a showgirl, model and dancer. PM Photos by Weegee
PM, March 12, 1942, p.5

A great lesser-known photo… Photographer was INSIDE the patrol wagon…

Mrs. Reich was a refugee from Poland, the “wife of a New Jersey wax processor,” lived at the Hotel Woodrow (35 West 64th St), was 52 years old. She was murdered at the Hotel Sutton, 330 East 56th St on March 4th… Webb (“obscure actress college graduate”) and Shonbrun were living in 438 East 147th St in the Bronx… Miss Webb had an I.Q. of 90; Cullen’s I.Q. was 107; Shonbrun possessed an I.Q. of 102 according to the psychiatrist quoted by the NY Times

“…she turned her eyes to the mural of modern justice…”

On January 9, 1967 Madeline Webb left the New York State Prison for Women in Bedford Hills after 24 years. Thanks to Governor Nelson Rockefeller’s Christmas clemency. She spent 22 years working as the prison librarian. (“As the sole inmate librarian, she spent almost every weekday of the past 22 years in the small but busy library.” THS, January 7, 1967.) She was 53 years old.


New York Times, March 1942 – February 1944

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PM, March 2, 1943

“When fire swept the five-story loft building at 372 E. Houston St., Manhattan, the policeman, above, rescued these two kittens from a hallway. Later he gave them to Miss Sally Strumfeld, 218 Delancey St., who promised to give them a good home. Some small manufacturing firms and the Congregation Israel Anscheigal Icie Minhagsford occupy the Houston St. building. Holy scrolls were carried out by members of the congregation.” PM Photo by Weegee


Weegee, Naked City, 1945, pp. 60-61


PM, March 2, 1941, p50

A N.Y. Police Reporter’s Impressions of Washington D.C.

Story and Pictures by WEEGEE

“Things were quiet all week in New York. Nothing was popping. There were no big time murders, no roasts (people burned to death at tenement house fires) and no dry divers (people jumping out of windows and off ledges) for me to photograph. So I thought I would go to Washington and do a picture story on what goes on there.

I went on the poor man’s Pullman. I was in no hurry and besides on a bus you can always meet a nice little cutie to keep you company and hold hands with.

At the bus terminal on West 50th St., in the basement, sandwiched in between two doors was an automatic photo machine. I dropped a dime in and had my photo taken. I got the photo in about two minutes. This was the first time I received a mechanical insult…

Inside the juke box was going strong with the Andrews Sisters singing Johnny Peddler… As we left the place the Andrews Sisters in a whiz-bang finale gave everything they had with Beat Me Daddy Eight to a Bar assisted by Woody Herman on Decca record No. 3454…

The Madam then read my palm, asked me the date of my birth, told me I was born under the sign of Cancer, was a very determined person, fickle, but has a kind heart and could make some woman very happy…

The Madam’s crack about me being a salesman reminded me that I was in Washington to do a picture story… so I jumped in a taxi and in an hour made some…

I am glad to get back to New York.”


PM, March 2, 1941, p50


Andrews Sisters, Johnny Peddler (I Got), Andrews Sisters; Vic Schoen And His Orchestra; Lew Brown; Laurindo De Almeida; Ubirajara Nesdan; August 3, 1940


Woody Herman And His Orchestra; Beat Me Daddy, Eight to a Bar; Woody Herman And His Orchestra; Woody Herman; Don Raye; Hughie Prince; Eleanore Sheehy; 1940; Decca 3454 B


Andrews Sisters; Beat Me Daddy, Eight to a Bar; Andrews Sisters; Vic Shoen And His Orchestra; Don Raye; Hughie Prince; Eleanore Sheehy; 1940; Decca 3375 B

(This may not be the most important thing in this amazing full page of a NY Police Reporter’s Impressions of Washington DC., but the Weegeeweegeeweegee fact checking department spotted a potential discrepancy, if Weegee heard the Andrews Sisters sing Beat Me Daddy, Eight to a Bar it was probably not Decca 3454 B, it was probably Decca 3375 B, that Weegee heard on the juke box 78 years ago… again, not the most important thing…)


PM, March 2, 1941
The Art Students Hold Their Annual Party… But Is It Art?
Miss Babita, that’s the whole name, is a well known psychic, her friends said. The sign may indicate some of her friends aren’t.

This is a mermaid costume that won first prize, a bagful of money which she didn’t count. The winner in the costume is Renee Parsons.

She graced the annual ball of the Art Students’ League at the Commodore Friday night and she is Natalia Munez.
PM photos by Weegee


New York Post, March 1, 1941


Weegee, Naked City, 1945, pp. 214-215


PM, February 24, 1941, p. 20

Weegee Meets Interesting People At a 6 a.m. Sunday Fire
“Cruising around Times Square at 6 a.m. Sunday with the police radio on in my car…”



PM, February 25, 1941, pp. 12-13 (photos by Max Coplan)

Mrs. Gargantua the Great… A Picture Profile

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PM, December 26, 1940, p15

Weegee Covers Christmas in New York… In Pictures and Words…

By Weegee

Early Christmas Eve I received a phone call from Wesley Price, one of PM’s picture editors. Price told me he wanted a good holiday picture, something with plenty of OOMPH. Lots of Christmas spirit in it. in other words a masterpiece. Jokingly I replied you just couldn’t order a picture like that, like you would a box of cigars. It had to happen. However, I asked him if he had any suggestions. He suggested that I get the picture in for the first edition.

I left police headquarters in my car at 2:30 Christmas morning. I turned the two radios on. One the regular broadcast receiver, to get some holiday music to put me in the mood; and the other radio, a police short wave receiver to get the police signals so I would know what was going on.

The first police call I picked up was for West and Bank Sts. When I got there I found a car with a Jersey license, turned on its side, with a cop on top of it. Nobody seemed to be hurt. Soon a towing wagon arrived to take the car away. I made a shot of it and was on my way.

Then I picked up six fire alarm signals. They were all false. I didn’t think Santa did that.

Then I stopped at the All Night Mission at No. 8 Bowery. [Not the still extant Bowery Mission.] Every night in the year about 100 hopelessly beaten and homeless men sit on benches and sleep as best they can.

Except for a Christmas tree in front, everything was the same. The same despair and hopelessness. I tiptoed in at 4 in the morning, being careful not to disturb anyone. Everyone was asleep. The place was as usual playing to “Sitting up” only. The same electric sign was lit with the illuminated big letters, JESUS SEES, the only source of light in the place. I wondered if He approved…

On the way out, along a big stove near the door, I noticed a pair of stockings, turned inside out, hung to dry.

Next I picked up a police alarm for 102nd St. and Lexington Ave. When I got there I found a man had been stabbed to death and was lying on the corner. From the St. John’s Episcopal Church, on the opposite corner, came the sound of organ music and the singing of the Christmas worshipers. I made a shot of the scene and started back to police headquarters.

When I arrived at my home, in back of Police Headquarters, I found a package wrapped in fancy paper outside my door. It was a present from my Chinese laundry man, Willie Chu, of 95 Elizabeth St. It contained a pound of tea and a half pound of lichee nuts. I had been looking for the Christmas spirit all night long. And had found it, on my doorstep. Lichee NUTS to you, Santa Claus…

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Weegee’s Christmas day journey (on a Google Map), might look like this.

A soon-to-be classic New York City Christmas story…


PM, December 26, 1940, p15


The New York Times, October 18, 1948

The Office of Civilian Defense announces the following instructions to be carried out “When an air raid comes.”

Approaches to New York Harbor Mined by Navy.

New York Has Skyscrapers for Air Raid Shelters
Simple Safety Rules will Save Lives When the Bombers Come…”

Simple Rules Show How to Make a Home Safer in Raids

Blackout Curtains Will Hinder Night Bomb Raiding

What Are Bombs Like? Here Are Some of the Answers“.

PM, December 11, 1941

(For the first time ever, we present possibly useful information…)