Cry of the City,” 1948

Starring Richard Conte (two years before “Sleeping City”).
Directed by Robert Siodmak.
(Spoiler alert: Brief but important scene in a photographer’s studio.)

Is “Cry of the City” (1948), filmed, in part, on the streets on New York City, better than “Naked City” (1948), filmed on the streets of New York City… Would be a great double feature…



(images from ebay)

Sold for: $11.99
Sold by: photoart50

“From world famous archive!
This photo was among a collection of stamped weegee photos there is a photo of the stamp in description.
That is how we know this is a weegee photograph.. but because it is not stamped we cant charge the going rate.

this photo is not stamped!
Weegee was the pseudonym of Arthur Fellig, a photographer and photojournalist, known for his stark black and white street photography…

PHOTO IS IN GOOD CONDITION FOR ITS AGE AND RARITY”

(words from ebay)

Obviously this was not made by Weegee.




(images from ebay)

Sold for: $11.99
Sold by: photoart50

“From world famous archive!
This photo was among a collection of stamped weegee photos there is a photo of the stamp in description.
That is how we know this is a weegee photograph.. but because it is not stamped we cant charge the going rate.

this photo is not stamped!
Weegee was the pseudonym of Arthur Fellig, a photographer and photojournalist, known for his stark black and white street photography…

PHOTO IS IN GOOD CONDITION FOR ITS AGE AND RARITY”

(words from ebay)

Obviously this photo was not made by Weegee.


PM, July 20, 1942

Sunday Afternoon on Cherry St.
Happy days were there again, until the radio cops came around and gave Meyer Falk, 334 Cherry St., a summons for turning on the hydrant. While this was going on, we had 92 degrees; new high for the…”

77 years ago today…


Saturday Afternoon in NYC…

Today…


(screenshot, NY Times, July 19, 2019)

“Ida Wyman, Whose Camera Captured Ordinary People, Dies at 93

Ms. Wyman photographed for Life, Business Week and her own enjoyment, satisfying “an immense curiosity to learn and understand the lives of others.”…

After graduating in 1943, she found work at Acme, first in its mailroom and then as a printer. At lunch hour, she photographed nearby laborers and office workers with her Graflex Speed Graphic camera…

The six years featuring her most memorable work ended in 1951. By then she had married Simon Nathan, a photographer at Acme, who encouraged her to join the Photo League, a radical collective. Working there further inspired her to produce honest photographs that could effect social change…”