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Tag Archives: 1941


Weegee (1899-1968), Naked City, 1945, pp. 226-227 (Odds and Ends chapter)


PM, March 9, 1941, p. 18

This Time It Really Snowed in New York – 12 Inches, More to Come

A commuter from New Jersey opened her umbrella as she left the 125th St. ferry, had it turned inside out by a 35 m.p.h. wind.

Thousands of automobiles parked overnight were found like this by owners Saturday morning.
PM, March 9, 1941, p. 18


PM, August 31, 1941

Holiday Accidents took their toll as motorists started their Labor Day week end. Early yesterday Joseph Morris and his brother’s wife, Charlotte, were killed when his car overturned in Bronx Park. The driver, Anthony Morris, Navy purchasing agent, was overturned was injured. Three other auto deaths had been listed last night; the Motor Vehicle Bureau says about 40 will die before Tuesday7 in New York State. PM, August 31, 1941


PM, May 28, 1941 (One Weegee photo made in Times Square)

World War Two (and Murder Inc. and bird) news… (Important day in the history of WWII and the U.S.)


PM, May 25, 1941, p.20

The latest in Aimée Crocker, Murder Inc., and pigeon news…


PM, May 25, 1941, p.51 (by Robert Rice)

How N.Y. Prepares to Defend Itself From Bombers

New York City prepares for war. (About seven months before they entered the war.)


PM, May 25, 1941, p.51


PM, May 25, 1941, p.52

Emergency Services are Ready for Action


PM, May 25, 1941, p.52


PM, May 25, 1941, p.53

Museum Therapeutics
As far as property damage from bombs goes, opinion is that such large buildings as hospitals and museums would be extremely vulnerable. Museum tycoons, however, are not making extensive plans to stow their treasures for the duration. Only small, movable stuff would be transported. The rest would be left both because moving it would be much too difficult and because museums provide a popular form of escapism during a crises.”


PM, May 25, 1941, p.53


PM, May 25, 1941, p.53 (police headquarters, 250 Centre St.)

Won’t Be Caught

The co-operating organizations are innumerable, ranging from specialized bodies of engineers, doctors, architects and so forth, specifically devoted to defense to all kinds of civilian organization which have nothing but time, energy and good to contribute.

To sum up: The City Fathers are by no means unaware of the possible dangers to New York in the event of war, and they are preparing to meet them. Probably a larger part of the plans have not yet been made public, Some of them never will be. But if the ominous buzz of enemy aircraft ever sounds over New York the city won’t be caught with its guard down.”


PM, May 23, 1941, p. 10

There’s something for everyone on this “Record of a New York Day”… Bowery news, bridges, scattered pies, dough, ice cream, crime in Brooklyn, the Bronx, hot weather, tenements, the Lower East Side, kids, a kitten, euthanasia… And more apple news… If the Civil War ended in 1865, then… in 1941 the Civil War was more recent, more contemporary, then 1941 is to us today, in 2020. (A mere 76 years versus 79 years ago…)

A photo that is similar to Weegee’s photo of kids and kitten on a fire escape appears in Weegee’s recently republished book Naked City


Naked City, pp. 22-23

(Speaking of a Naked City:)


PM, May 23, 1941, p. 13 (Photo by Gene Badger)

“Scene: East River. Time: 3 p.m. Temperature: 90.7

Yesterday’s 90.7 degrees made it the hottest day of the year… The Bronx was bombarded by a freak hailstorm… Cvek, the convicted strangler asked Sing Sing officials why the prison wasn’t air-conditioned.”


PM, October 5, 1941

Wrong Number: At least that’s the expression on Rainbow’s face, who seems ready to purr: “That ain’t my master’s voice.” This black cat used to live at the Aquarium. But the Aquarium is closed. Reporters at Manhattan Police Headquarters adopted Rainbow. PM Photo by Bob Evans.”