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Tag Archives: 1944


PM, June 7, 1944, p.20

The Face of New York on Invasion Day

The crowds in Times Square were serious yesterday – glad that D-Day had come and yet solemn at the thought of the boys in the fighting. Below you see some of the faces turned up toward the electric sign on the Times building as bulletins of Allied progress were flashed out. Photos by Weegee.


PM, June 7, 1944, p.20


“D-Day Polka,” Brunon Kryger “King of the Polkas” and his International Orchestra, 1945


“Woman Laughing (Continuous)”


PM, June 2, 1944 pp. 12-13 (photos by Weegee and Arthur Leipzig)

A Weegee Gets Attention At Museum of Modern Art

The big picture at lower right is the center of attraction in Weegee’s section of the Art in Progress photo exhibition now on view at the Museum of Modern Art. It shows Mrs. George Washington Kavanaugh and Lady Decies outside the Metropolitan Opera House – and the eloquent facial reaction of another woman. The other pictures on this page were snapped by Weegee as visitors to the photo exhibition looked at his pictures. Four out of his five exhibits have appeared in PM. The opera shot got the most laughs. Weegee reports.

Staten Island Girl Scouts Turn Farmerettes


Everybody’s Laughing, Teddy Wilson and his Orchestra; Billie Holiday; Lerner; Oakland, 1938

Art in Progress, May 24 – September 17, 1944.
(Three out of five photos appeared as news items; “I Cried…” was used in a photography column; “The Critic” made its debut in this article…)


Laughing At Life, Billie Holiday, 1940


Weegee, “Installation view of Weegee’s exhibition in Art in Progress, Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1944″ (Weegee’s World, p. 28)


Screenshot of checklist, moma.org


Laughing Boogie, Eddie Chamblee and The Band; Chamblee, 1951


Everyone’s Laughing, Clyde McPhatter, Winfield Scott, 1954


Screen shots from Stanley Kubrick’s “Killer’s Kiss” (1955).


Screen shots from “Killer’s Kiss.” Mannequin factory owner, played by Skippy Adelman, and mannequins.


PM, October 1945. Photo by Skippy Adelman.


New York Age, May 1950. Photo by Skippy Adelman.



PM, 1945. Photo by Skippy Adelman.



Weegee-esque screen shots from “Killer’s Kiss.”


PM, October 1944. Talking dog for the war effort story. Photo by Skippy Adelman.


PM, September 6, 1944, p. 16

“Take heed! New York will be bombed tomorrow!” Thus called Mrs. Elizabeth Lassen, 54, as she sat nude on the roof parapet of her apartment house at 1 W. 30th St., with her legs dangling over the edge. A neighbor induced her to leave her perch by offering her a cup of coffee. She drank the coffee and returned to the edge, but was coaxed back to safety by police who took her to Bellevue for observation . Neighbors said Mrs. Lassen had expressed concern over the safety of her husband a merchant ship caption who is at sea. PM, September 6, 1944, p. 16

And so the 24‐year‐old Parsons graduate decided to find a niche of his own. “I’ve always loved environmental fabrics,” he explained. “When I was a kid, I had swatches’ pinned all over my room.” The fabrics led to pillows and Mr. Carrieri opened his Pillow Salon at 1 West 30th Street last year. NY Times, May 18, 1968.

Living Amid Office Buildings With a Legend of Lillian Russell

George Washington never slept at 1 West 30th Street. That’s one fact accepted by the tenants of one of Manhattan’s most romantic and most improbable apartment houses.
NY Times, May 18, 1968.


WEEGEEWEEGEEWEEGEE, September 6, 2020

Fifth Avenue and Thirtieth Street Corner Sold for One Million Dollars — Deal for Grand Street Corner — Sales by Brokers and at Auction.

Frederick Fox Co. have sold the eight-story Wilbraham building at 284 Fifth Avenue, northwest corner of Thirtieth Street, opposite the Holland House. The structure, which covers a plot 40 by 125, was one of the first and finest bachelor apartment houses erected in the Fifth Avenue section, and was owned by Mrs. Emily H. Moir. NY Times, January 3, 1908.


PM, June 2, 1944, pp.12-13 (photos by Weegee and Arthur Leipzig)


Screenshot, moma.com, (photo by Ansel Adams)

(Just a name and a sliver of a silver gelatin print, “Woman Shot from Cannon, New York, 1943.”)


Screenshot from of exhibition checklist from moma.com

“My Man, 1941” – 95.1943 is online

“Tenement Fire, 1939” – 96.1943 is online

“Woman Shot from Cannon, New York, 1943” – 696.1943 is online

“Art in Progress: 15th Anniversary Exhibitions: Photography” at MoMA, May 24 – September 17, 1944

To be continued…

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Art in Progress: 15th Anniversary Exhibitions: Photography
May 24–September 17, 1944
At MoMA, in NYC.

“FELLIG, Arthur (Weegee). American, born Austria 1900.
Brooklyn School Children See Gambler Murdered in Street. (225.42)
Oct. 8, 1941. Given anonymously.
*Tenement Fire, Brooklyn. Dec.14,1939. ILL. p.158. (96.43)
My Man, N.Y.C. 1941. (95.43)
Woman Shot from Can[n]on, N.Y.C. 1943. (696.43)
Above 3 prints Purchase Fund.
Opening Night at the Opera, N.Y.C.1944. Given anonymously.

All info and images from moma.org

Two years in a row: 1943, 1944 at MoMA, in NYC…

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New York Herald Tribune, February 28, 1944 (Photo by Weegee)
Fire Destroys ‘the World’s Largest Scenic Railway’ at Coney Island
Firemen fighting the four-alarm fire which razed the Thompson Scenic Railway late Saturday Night. Minor damage was done to concessions in adjacent Luna Park and to ties of the B.M.T. elevated tracks, causing the rerouting of all trains on four lines.”

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Weegee, Unknown Weegee, February 28, 1944, p. 40 (Photo by Weegee)

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Daily Mirror, February 28, 1944 (Mirror Photo, presumably not by Weegee)
“FOUR-ALARMER IN CONEY ISLAND. Hundreds of firemen, coast guardsmen and wardens were called out to combat a spectacular week-end fire which reduced to these ruins Coney Island’s Scenic Railway, called the oldest and largest amusement device in U.S. Unused Luna Park property and adjoining concessions were damaged. The orgin of the blaze is unknown.”

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New York Times, February 28, 1944 (Associated Press, presumably not Weegee)
“Coney Island Scenic Railway After it Was Gutted by Flames
The L.A. Thompson landmark – called one of the oldest and largest amusement devices of its kind in the country – was destroyed by fire on Saturday night. It is adjacent to famed Luna Park and four alarms were turned in before the blaze was under control.”

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PM, February 28, 1944, (PM Photo by Weegee)
“Plug for Wimpy by Weegee
An auxiliary fireman handing coffee to rain-soaked firefighters at the Thompson Scenic Railway fire at Coney Island yesterday poses long enough to give Weegee this picture.”

(It’s fascinating that while photographing the tragedy of a large fire at Coney Island, Weegee also made this funny foto of a coffee-toting fire-buff goofing around with Wimpy the hamburg-loving cartoon character and friend of Popeye. And that this is the photo that PM published of the fire…)

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Weegee’s People, 1946


Irrelevant: Popeye, Amusement Park (1947), from youtube – here… “It’s marvelous…”

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New York Daily News, November 10, 1944 (unidentified photographers)

Speaking of Frank Pape… we made these photos a few years ago of the Daily News on microfilm at NYPL… There’s no direct Weegee involvement in these pages…

The Game That Cost A Life
… “I said, ‘Wanna’ play tie-up?’ The kid said, ‘Okay.’ I took him to the cellar and got rope.'” Seemingly unmoved, 16-year old Frank Pape stares at the ropes he used in “commando” strangling of 4-year-old Billy Drach as he answers questions of Bronx Assistant District Attorney Sylvester Ryan after confession yesterday. The boy told how he took the Drach lad to the basement of 825 Eagle Ave., Bronx and there reenacted a scene from a movie he had just witnessed…”
New York Daily News, November 10, 1944

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825 Eagle Ave., Bronx, NY, Google street view and maps

[Perhaps the scene of the crime is a vacant lot according to Google.]