Archive

1945




Extra! Weegee!, pp. 300-301

“Weegee” Lends a Helping Hand
New York — Down at the Bronx Terminal Market, 151st and Exterior Sts., to cover the picketing by retail dealers, photographer “Weegee” got into the swing of things and carried a placard for the picketers. Here, he holds up the sign denouncing black marketeers, all the while puffing on his big cigar and keeping his camera handy for a good picture. The market was picketed by dealers protesting the black market and tie-in sales.
5/29/45



PM, August 20, 1940

They’d Sooner Be at the Beach But, Heat or No Heat, Jobs Are Scarce
Weegee, the wag, finished up the day by taking his own picture in the darkroom. Note camera release in his hand.


Billie’s Blues, “Billie Holiday and her Orchestra; Billie Holiday, 1936.


Billie Holiday, Joe Guy, her trumpeter-husband, and Mister, her dog, photographed in Billie’s dressing room at the Downbeat Club. Photo by Skippy Adelman.

“One of the these days things will get better,” she sighed. “They’ll get better for everybody. We’ll all have a chance to eat and sleep in peace. I just know it will come about. It will take a long time, but it will come about. It won’t be in my lifetime, though. Oh, no, I’ll never profit by it.”

PM, 1945, Photos by Skippy Adelman.


Why Was I Born?“, Teddy Wilson and His Orchestra, Billie Holiday, Teddy Wilson, John Jackson, Lester Young, Joe Jones, Walter Page, Buck Clayton, Freddie Green, Oscar Hammerstein 2nd, Jerome Kern, 1937.


New York Post, 1945.


I Must Have That Man!“, Teddy Wilson and His Orchestra, Billie Holiday, Teddy Wilson, John Jackson, Lester Young, Joe Jones, Walter Page, Buck Clayton, Freddie Green, Fields, McHugh, 1937.


Manhattan Phone book, 1940.


Fine and Mellow,” Billie Holiday and her Orchestra, Frankie Newton, Billie Holiday, 1939.


Billie Holiday singing Strange Fruit. Billie says: “It depresses me every time I sing it. It reminds me of how Pop died. But I have to sing it. Things are still going on in the south.
PM, 1945, Photos by Skippy Adelman.


Strange Fruit,” Billie Holiday and her Orchestra, Sonny White, Lewis Allan, 1939.

Billie Holiday (April 7, 1915 – July 17, 1959).


Weegee, Naked City, 1945, pp. 148-149

Shorty, the Bowery cherub, welcomed the New Year…


“Shorty, the Bowery Cherub, New Years Eve at Sammy’s Bar,” 1943
Barth, Miles, Weegee’s World, New York: Bullfinch Press, 1997, p.139


“Shorty, the Bowery cherub, welcomed the New Year…”
Weegee, Naked City, New York: Essential Books, 1945, p. 148


“Shorty, the Bowery cherub, welcomes the New Year…”
Weegee, Naked City, Cincinnati, Ohio: Zebra Picture Books, 1948


Weegee (1899-1968), Naked City, 1945, pp. 226-227 (Odds and Ends chapter)


PM, March 9, 1941, p. 18

This Time It Really Snowed in New York – 12 Inches, More to Come

A commuter from New Jersey opened her umbrella as she left the 125th St. ferry, had it turned inside out by a 35 m.p.h. wind.

Thousands of automobiles parked overnight were found like this by owners Saturday morning.
PM, March 9, 1941, p. 18


The New York Times, July 22, 1945

To commemorate the recently republished book, Weegee’s magnum opus, “Naked City,” a timeless (and funny: “But I had the sense to quit when the talkies came in” and insightful: “his favorite subjects are dummies…” and informative: “till last May Weegee was with…” and profound: “One day you’re a hero…”) piece from the The New York Times


Langston Hughes, Chicago Defender, December 8, 1945, p. 14

“And a wonderful, wonderful book with a brief Harlem section is Weegee’s “Naked City.” It’s just about the most dramatic and at times, amusing collection of photographs ever put together. It’s about New York – a swell book for photographers, amateur and professional, travellers, would-be-travellers, and anyone else who can see pictures. There’s a slight, incisive text which you don’t have to read, for Weegee’s photos say everything.”
Langston Hughes, Chicago Defender, December 8, 1945, p. 14


Langston Hughes, Chicago Defender, December 8, 1945, p. 14

“NEW TECHNIQUE OF MULTIPLE CIRCULATING EXHIBITIONS ON DISPLAY
AT MUSEUM OF MODERN ART”

“To satisfy, at least in part, the craving for accurate and understandable information both visual and verbal about various phases of art, the Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 Street, is preparing in multiple form a series of small, compact but very complete exhibitions to be sold or circulated throughout the country
and even abroad. Two of these exhibitions, What is Modern Painting? and Creative Photography, will be shown in the Museum’s Auditorium galleries Wednesday, March 7, for a period of three weeks, closing Sunday, March 25.”

“CREATIVE PHOTOGRAPHY
In terms understandable to the amateur, this 12-panel exhibition demonstrates the tremendous possibilities of the camera as a medium of Creative expression. Mounted on colored panels, more than two dozen major photographs by Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Helen Levitt, Berenice Abbott,
Weegee,
Henri Cartier-Bresson and other outstanding American and European photographers, are reproduced by an extraordinarily accurate process. A group of smaller photographs made particularly for the exhibition by Andreas Feininger, noted photographer who acted as adviser, illustrates certain technical points. The panels also include text and explanatory diagrams under the following headings:

The photographer is an artist
He [and she] works with a mechanical tool
His [and her] medium is a scale of values
He [and she] selects the subject
He [and she] composes with his camera
He [and she] selects the moment
The camera records infinite detail
The camera creates its own perspective
The camera extends or compresses space
The camera stops or prolongs motion
The camera translates color into black-and-white.

This exhibition sells for $25.00. No rental copies are available.”

Creative Photography
March 6–25, 1945
At MoMA, in NYC.

Information from moma.org.

Three in a row: 1943, 1944 and 1945, at MoMA…