Archive

World War II


“Air Raid”; 1957


“Air Raid Sirens”; 1960


PM, September 21, 1942, p.9

Last Time Tonight At Polo Grounds:

What Air Raid here Might Be Like

What might happen during an air attack on New York is subject of Polo Grounds show that goes on for the last time tonight. Saturday was the first night of the show, and these photos show you what it’s like. Because it’s important, admission is free and no tickets are required. Furthermore, the Polo Grounds can hold, without crowding, a lot more than the 10,000 persons who were there Saturday. Show starts at 8, lasts till about 10:30, and our photographer, Weegee says it’s pretty good. Come early and bring the kids.

Master Sgt. Monroe R. Bethman shows what enemies who bomb New York would get in return as he demonstrates how to wreck pillbox with flame-thrower.

Control panel like one that will be used by New York to keep track of enemy planes is an exhibit.

Mayor La Guardia and Col. Joseph D. Sears led parade before show started Saturda. Mayor gave Oath of Allegiance to crowd.

Using chair for shield, U.S. soldier puts out incendiary bomb with stream of water. Loud explosions make show realistic.

PM, September 21, 1942, p.9


“Obey Your Air Raid Warden”; Tony Pastor and his Orchestra; Tony Pastor; Les Burness; John Morris; March 16, 1942


PM, September 21, 1942, p.10

As House was ‘Bombed’ at Polo Grounds

These two photos show miniature building “bombed” in Polo Grounds show. Here bomb has struck sat building afire. Now see here –

Firemen quickly get the flames under control. Show demonstrates that homes with clean attics are more fire-resistant than others.

Trapped in one of the “bombed” buildings policeman W. C. Gossman needs first aid. Emergency squad arrives, and –

Gossman is carried away for attention. All bombs from two-pound… to 4000-pound German “Satan” are shown at Polo Grounds.

PM, September 21, 1942, p.10


“In Case of an Air Raid”; Harold Grant and His Orchestra; The Good Fellows; H. Lenk; E. Drake; Harold Drake; 1942


“Air Raid Warden”


PM, December 23, 1940, p.1

Boy Meets Girl – and that’s no posed meeting as he came home last night on Christmas furlough with 5000 other soldiers. That’s not anguish you read in the face of the woman at the right. The Christmas package in her hand as she waits for her soldier is the tip-off. She too, is overcome with joy. (See page 15.) Photo by Weegee
PM, December 23, 1940, p.1

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PM, December 23, 1940, p15. PM photos by Weegee

Home For Christmas Are the Soldiers From Alabama.
For nearly seven hours wives, girl friends, mothers and fathers swarmed into Pennsylvania Station to greet 5000 men returning from Fort McClellan, Anniston, Ala., on Christmas furlough. The special sections ran far behind schedule but the festive spirit of the crowd overwhelmed any feeling of boredom at the delay. The off schedules were caused by heavy traffic on southern routes of other trains distributing the new trainees throughout the country for the holidays. Then, too, special stops had to be made to take aboard more drinking water and sandwiches. Here, part of the crowd waits.

Marie Buoragura of 69 Marcy Ave., Brooklyn, trusts that there are not too many soldiers named John but the signal, written in lipstick on a newspaper carries her message.

What their names are is not particularly important. The picture of Him meeting Her is eloquent enough in its bliss and perfect obliviousness to thousands of others who gave and received similar greetings at the station. The soldiers will remain here for none days, then entrain back to Alabama.
PM, December 23, 1940, p.15.

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Grand Central Station, December 23, 2012

…People swarmed Grand Central Station… the Apple store overwhelmed any feeling of boredom. (Weegee, a wartime photographer…) Here, part of the crowd walks, waits, and photographs…



Grand Central Station, December 24, 2020


PM, December 23, 1940

These Pictures Are PM’s Gift to You…
They are being given to readers who give PM Christmas gift subscriptions. Page 7 gives details.

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PM, October 21, 1940 (Drawings by William Sharp, photos by Alan Fiasher)

SMUGGLED SKETCHBOOK
The Nazi Terror
On the next four pages, PM presents the first in a series of pictures smuggled from Germany in the early days of Hitler’s reign.
They were drawn by William Sharp, now an American artist…”

William Sharp:
“Born Leon Schleifer in Lemberg, Austria (now part of Ukraine), [on June 13, 1900], Sharp studied fine art in Austria and Poland before finishing his studies at the University in Berlin in 1918. After serving briefly in the German army at the end of World War I, he stayed on in Berlin and worked as a book illustrator, painter, etcher, and lithographer… In the late 1920s, as Adolph Hitler’s National Socialist Party grew, Sharp, under various pseudonyms, drew political cartoons satirizing the party and its leader in the anti-Nazi press. After being threatened with imprisonment by the Nazis in 1933, Schleifer and his wife Ruth fled the country and arrived in New York the following year. In 1940, Schleifer became a United States citizen and changed his name to William Sharp. The Sharps settled in Forest Hills and stayed in the same apartment until William’s death in 1961 and Ruth’s in 2002.” Queens Museum website

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(Photo by Leo Lieb.)

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(Photos by Bill Brunk and Peter Killian.)

PM, October 18, 1940 Vol. 1, No. 89
It was 40 degrees colder than today… “City’s First Draft Board Sworn In…” Marshall Field becomes largest share holder in PM… Oil in Iraq and Iran? “The Fifth -Column and Its Fellow-Travelers”… “This is the Way They Make a Ballet: ‘The New Yorker.'” And a small World War Two-related Weegee photo…