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Screenshot from eastman.org.

Copied from eastman.org:

“Inscriptions verso (ink): The notice for Burglars Ball
Hospital took this notice
down

(stamped): [inscription partially obscured] photo sold for use in one Publication
[illeg.] not to be resold, loaned, [illeg.]
[illeg.] used for advertising purposes with [illeg.]
written permission.
CREDIT LINE MUST READ
photo by
A. FELLIG
5 CENTER MARKET PLACE, N. Y. C.”

This is intriguing… another “Burglar’s Ball” photo recently acquired by GEH…

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Daily Mail, August 2, 2018 (Updated 8:18 EDT), screenshot

Text copied from dailymail.com:

Grisly crime scene pictures of bloodied murder victims from early 1900s New York City taken by legendary news photographer Weegee are seen in color for the first time

Arthur Fellig took dozens of harrowing crime scene photos by following emergency services around
He was first on scene so often he was said to be able to predict crime and was nicknamed Weegee…
Black and white photos were painstakingly colorized for the first time by Frenchman Frédéric Duriez

By Nic White For Mailonline

Published: 06:08 EDT, 2 August 2018 | Updated: 08:18 EDT, 2 August 2018

Gruesome early 20th Century crime scenes of New York’s gangland murders by a legendary news photographer can be seen in color for the first time.

The unnerving shots by Arthur Fellig show the bodies of Robert Green and Jacob Jagendorf after a failed robbery attempt, a bloodied couple lying dead in bed, and a murder victim with a chalk outline drawn around him.
Fellig was said to have been able to ‘predict’ crime and captured dozens of harrowing scenes under the pseudonym Weegee by following emergency services around…”
“Fellig revolutionized photojournalism with his stark portraits of urban crime scenes, often shooting the aftermath of violent murders and horrific accidents.
The images captured the rapidly changing city that New York was in the decade before prohibition, which itself brought a fresh wave of violent crime.
Fellig worked on New York City’s Lower East Side as a press photographer during the 1930s and 1940s, and developed his signature style by following the city’s emergency services and documenting their activity.
Much of his work depicted unflinchingly realistic scenes of urban life, crime, injury and death…”
“The photos like this one of a woman who was murdered in her own bed in a run-down apartment can now be seen in brilliant color, as with her purple dress, for the first time. The unnerving shots were taken by Arthur Fellig, who was said to have been able to ‘predict’ crime and captured dozens of harrowing scenes under the pseudonym Weegee by following emergency services around.
He published photographic books and also worked in cinema, initially making his own short films and later collaborating with film directors such as Jack Donohue and Stanley Kubrick.
Fellig earned his nickname, a phonetic rendering of Ouija, because of his frequent, seemingly prescient arrivals at scenes only minutes after crimes, fires or other emergencies were reported to authorities.
He is variously said to have named himself Weegee or to have been named either by the staff at Acme Newspictures or by a police officer…”

Above text copied from dailymail.com.


Daily Mail, August 2, 2018 (Updated 10:55 EDT), screenshot

Text copied from dailymail.com:

Grisly crime scene pictures of bloodied murder victims from early 1900s New York City are seen in color for the first time

WARNING GRAPHIC CONTENT…
They were taken in the first two decades of the 20th Century as New York underwent social change
Black and white photos were painstakingly colorized for the first time by Frenchman Frédéric Duriez
Gruesome early 20th Century crime scenes of New York’s gangland murders, robberies gone wrong, and crimes of passion can be seen in color for the first time.
The unnerving shots show the bodies of two thieves who fell down an elevator shaft in a failed robbery attempt, a bizarre murder-suicide, and a victim with a chalk outline drawn around him.
The black and white crime scene photographs were painstakingly colorized by Frédéric Duriez, 52, from Angres, France, to show what detectives would really have seen.
‘I think that it’s is a haunting collection of crime scene photographs never meant to be seen by the public in color,’ he said.
‘I like how picture was taken, just above the character, this increases the dramatic side of the scene. It is by chance that I discovered these pictures on the internet, they seemed fantastic. I thought, why not colorize them.’
The images captured the rapidly changing city that New York was in the decade before the prohibition of 1920-33, which itself brought a fresh wave of violent crime. ”

Above text copied from dailymail.com.

dailymail.co.uk

Obviously Weegee didn’t make the photos, they were made by unidentified photographers, the “original” digital files are from the NYC Municipal Archives.

Photography is not a competition.
Or, maybe it is…
I don’t know.


Double Take: A Comparative Look at Photographs, by Richard Whelan, 1981, pp. 152-53

BA’s photo was made in 1937, approximately six years before Weegee’s photo… 10 points for BA!
BA’s photo is presumably an 8×10 contact print… 18 points for BA!
Detailed caption: “Gunsmith and Police Department, 6 Centre Market Place and 240 Centre Street, Manhatan; February 4, 1937. Built in 1850 and 1906. Architect for Police Headquarters, Hoppin & Koehn…” (from MCNY blog)… 3,000 points for BA!

Impressively bewildering use of flash; day or night… 45 points for Weegee…
When was that photo made? Is that a positive or negative? Minus 44 points for Weegee…

Amazing depth of field… TKO for BA!

Even with a home field advantage…

Berenice Abbott wins round one!

Perhaps Weegee’s autobiography is back in print…

Perhaps “Weegee by Weegee” (1961) is now “Weegee: The Autobiography” by Arthur Fellig” (2016).

Paperback edition: $15.95
Paperback: 190 pages
Publisher: The Devault-Graves Agency (February 8, 2016)
Language: English

Copied from the publisher’s website:

“Weegee: The Autobiography

Weegee not only captured the gritty underbelly of New York City in his explosive photographs, but he lived it as well. This long out-of-print autobiography, brought back as an ebook with complete and unabridged text by Devault-Graves Digital Editions, was written toward the end of Weegee’s life before he was the photographic legend he is today.

Here he tell the story of how an impoverished Jewish immigrant named Arthur “Weegee” Fellig from Zlothev, Austria, came to grips with one of the toughest cities in the world and made it his own. In wisecracking prose that is a match for his unblinking ferocity behind the camera, Weegee recounts his days of taking tintypes of kids on ponies and how this knowledge of the streets and neighborhoods of New York led to him being the first on the scene of the city’s every murder, disaster and heartbreak.

In Weegee: The Autobiography the author candidly and without reserve tells readers about documenting the grisly street executions by Murder, Inc., tenements up in flames, child killers, lovers in the back rows of movie theaters, and the sexual misadventures of streetwalkers, pimps and transsexuals, all in a voice that had seen it all and loved it all.

Our version contains a wealth of new material for readers. Included are extensive annotations and endnotes, an original Afterword by author and critic Ed Ward, a bibliography of Weegee’s photography books, and a guide for further study on works about Weegee.”

http://devault-gravesagency.weebly.com/weegee-the-autobiography.html