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Weegee, Naked City, p. 80

“Murder in Hell’s Kitchen
One looks out of the windows… talks about the weather with a neighbor… or looks at a murder.”

Photo of people in a pair of windows on the second floor of 415 West 48th St

(That’s pretty close to 451 West 47th. St.)

They are above:
Chas. Kemp, plumbing, heating, 415 West 48th, CI rcle 6-9690
Night, Sun, and holidays WI ndsr 6-2536
and
Jos. Beck, electric contractor, 415 West 48, CI rcle 6-9262


(Images from ebay)

“RARE! WEEGEE: VINTAGE STAMPED PHOTO 1940s”

US $55.00 – Buy It Now, or Make an Offer

“JUST FOUND IN ARCHIVE Last one!!!

RARE WEEGEE PHOTO IN GOOD COUNDITION FOR ITS AGE AND RARITY!

Weegee was the pseudonym of Arthur Fellig, a photographer and photojournalist, known for his stark black and white street photography”

Item specifics:
Original/Reprint: Original Print
Listed By: Dealer or Reseller
Modified Item: No
Region of Origin: US
Date of Creation: 1940-1949
Photo Type: Gelatin Silver
Size Type/Largest Dimension: 5×4
Color: Black & White

(Words copied from ebay.)

***************************************
It might be “rare,” it might be “stamped,” it might be a photo…
(There are frequently misspellings and bad grammar in fraudulent ebay listings.)
Nevertheless this photo was not made by Weegee…


The New York Times, February 24, 1896

How to House the Poor

“Completed Plans of the Conference to be Held Next Week”

“Building Company May Be Formed”

“Meetings to be Held Afternoons and Evenings – Morning Tours of Inspection.”

“The question of how best to house the poor in the crowded districts of great cities will be discussed in an interesting series of meetings to be held in this city…”

“Will Improved Housing Pay?”- “Moral Aspects of the Question” – “Next Steps Forward,”…

“The meetings will be held in the large audience hall of the United Charities Building, 105 East Twenty-second Street…”


fotograhiska screenshot

[The United Charities Building, 105 East Twenty-second Street, also known as 287 Park Avenue South, built in 1892 or 1893 or 1894, sold for $128 million several years ago, soon, sometime in 2019, will be a “destination for photography.” (“A haven of innovation and free expression.”… “Fotografiska New York will be anything but an ordinary museum, and we look forward to sharing our world-class photography, award-winning culinary experience, innovative academy, and cultural event programming…”… “The Museum of Photography, 281 Park Avenue South, New York.”… fotograhiska.)]

“The party will visit the following places Wednesday morning:
6:30 – Department of Street Cleaning… Col. George Waring” [Waring died eight months later of yellow fever. Waring was a “designer and advocate of sewer systems that keep domestic sewage separate from storm runoff.” wikipedia]
“10 – People’s Bath, 9 Centre Market Place…” [While researching Centre Market Place we stumbled upon this fascinating article.]
“10:30 – Police Headquarters, 300 Mulberry Street, Theodore Roosevelt, President” [Teddy was president of the US from 1901-1909… Police headquarters at 240 Centre St. opened in 1909.]
“12:15 – Tee-To-Tum Club, 346 East Twenty-third Street…”

The New York Times, February 24, 1896


The New York Times, March 11, 1894

A perennial question as posed by The NY Times and addressed by the “Improved Housing Conference” 123 years ago today: “How to House the Poor.”

The Best Art Books of 2018
The Times’s art critics select some of their favorite art books and books related to art of the year.

by Roberta Smith
‘FLASH: THE MAKING OF WEEGEE THE FAMOUS’ By Christopher Bonanos (Henry Holt & Company). By current standards, the street photographer Arthur Fellig, better known as Weegee, might be considered a kind of performance artist: elbowing his way to the front of the more sensational scenes of New York night life, snapping pictures in his indelible noir style and developing them in the trunk of his car — so as to rush his product to the dailies ahead of the pack. His ambition, self-invention and neuroses are all detailed in this sharp biography by Mr. Bonanos, who clearly admires the artist, sees the unsavory aspects of the man and knows old New York as well as anyone too young to have lived through it. (Read the book review.)
NY Times, Dec. 14, 2018, p.C20″