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PM, June 23, 1942

Vengeance Bridges the Years

Feud begun in 1930, when two shipmates quarreled in a Brazilian port, according to police, ended this way in Greenwich Village, during the week end. A passerby is holding a match before the eyes of Anthony Acena Miras, 39, of 51 Atlantic Ave., Brooklyn, to see if he is still alive. Police arrested Manuel Lopez, 40, on a homicide charge. Miras was stabbed to death on sidewalk near 14th St. and Seventh Ave. He lies dying, above. PM Photo by Weegee


“It’s Murder,” Lil Armstrong And Her Swing Orchestra, Lil Armstrong, 1936


202 West 14th St., June 23, 2021


It’s Hard To Be Shut Up In Prison,” The Blind Soldier, David Miller, 1931

Charlie, The Bug, Gets Life Sentence After Undertaker Cohen Blasts Alibi for Killing

By John Kobler

Within 10 minutes after court convened yesterday and before his lawyers could barely get their defense wheeling, Charlie (The Bug) Workman was a cooked goose…

The six-year-old mystery of who killed Dutch Schultz had been penetrated. The deck was now clear for Mr. O’Dwyer to shoot at bigger game – Lepke Buchalter himself, who comes up for trial July 14.


PM, June 11, 1941, p.18 (PM Photo by Michael Strepka)


Jail Bird,” Sonny Knight; Jack Collier Orchestra; Bruce Morgan, 1956


PM, March 2, 1941


Weegee (1899-1968) and Mary Margaret McBride (1899-1976), July 1945

A picture with somebody in it sells better than a picture of a lifeless object. So Weegee sometimes puts himself in his picture-shooting them by “remote control.” Here he is posing as a “curious passerby” looking at the body of a Brooklyn murder victim found in t trunk near the Gowanus Canal.

Weegee makes friends readily. On a Chinatown assignment, he got this New Year’s lucky wish from a Chinese girl. He has a photo of her painting ot pinned above his bed (picture on next page). It is characteristic of him to have his picture taken this way. The cigar is standard equipment.

Weegee’s room shows his devotion to his job. On top of his regular radio is a police short-wave radio and a loudspeaker attached to it dangles over his bed. On the floor are his special “murder shoes” – at left – and his “snow shoes.” He keeps his “fire shoes” in his car. The wall decorations are examples of his work and certificates of awards for prize-winning pictures. The cardboard boxes at the extreme right are his disorderly “files.” The typewriter is his latest acquisition. He has recently taken up writing – a field in which he shows rather starltinh talent. We don’t know what the Flit is for.

PM, March 9, 1941, pp. 50-51

Today we are celebrating the birth of Weegee!


“Hot Bread,” Beverly White And Her Blues Chasers; Ward Baker, May 1943


“Cool Breeze,” Billy Eckstine; Gene Ammons; Dameron; Gillespie, 1946

Here’s How New Yorkers Try to Cool Off

These youngsters play in a flooded gutter on Carrol St., Brooklyn, the lad in the foreground showing just how he’d swim at the beach. It’s fun, but unsanitary. There’s virtually no limit to the diseases that could be picked up from street dirt. This picture gives you a concrete argument for more – not fewer – playgrounds, so greatly needed to keep young New York healthy. Photo by John De Biase, PM

This is better. Water straight out of a hose won’t hurt anybody. The young man is enjoying a shower on Dean St. Photo by Arthur Leipzig, PM


PM, June 6, 1943, p. 16

Here’s How New Yorkers Try to Cool Off

The hot nights have filled many a fire escape. A mother and two sons sleep outdoors at a tenement on East Houston and Mangin St. Photo by Weegee
PM, June 6, 1943, p. 16


“Cool Playin’ Mama, “Sammy Cotton; Paul Gayten and his Orchestra; Biggs; Cotton, 1950


“Cool Down Mamma,” Lost John Hunter and His Blind Bats, Lost John Hunter; Hunter, 1950


PM, June 7, 1944, p.20

The Face of New York on Invasion Day

The crowds in Times Square were serious yesterday – glad that D-Day had come and yet solemn at the thought of the boys in the fighting. Below you see some of the faces turned up toward the electric sign on the Times building as bulletins of Allied progress were flashed out. Photos by Weegee.


PM, June 7, 1944, p.20


“D-Day Polka,” Brunon Kryger “King of the Polkas” and his International Orchestra, 1945



Weegee, Naked City, 1945


PM, May 31, 1942, pp.8-9 (photo by Weegee)

Weegee, free-lance news photographer who drives around New York in search of pictures, got so many dirty looks during the first two weeks of gas rationing that he had a sign painter letter this card for the rack that used to hold his front license plate. Like one out of every 10 motorists in the East, Weegee has an X card.
PM, May 31, 1942, p.8


Extra! Weegee!, p. 19

Shrinking Violet Explains

New York – The envious looks of gasless former “Sunday Drivers” pierced the tender epidermis of “Weegee” noted New York freelance photographer as he toured the city while on the job today. To get rid of that uncomfortable feeling, “Weegee” mounted this explanation of gasoline expenditure on the front of his machine and immediately felt much better.
Credit Line (ACME) 5-24-42

Extra! Weegee!, p. 19


Screenshot, whitney.org


We’re the Sunday Drivers, Billy Murray’s Trio (Carl Mathieu, Monroe Silver and Murray), 1927


“Take It Slow and Easy,” Billy Banks’ Rhythmakers, Henry Allen, Pee-Wee Russell, Jow Sullivan, Eddie Condon, Jack Bland, Al Morgan, Zutty Singleton, Billy Banks, 1939


“The can-can girls in the When Paris is Paree Again number of the new show at Billy Rose’s Diamond Horseshoe.”
PM, May 31, 1943, p. 26 (Photo by Weegee)

Billy Rose Retreats Into the Future

By Louis Kronenberger

Having purveyed nostalgia and Gay-Ninetyish frou-frou at the Diamond Horseshoe for several years, Billy Rise about-faced Saturday night and marched into the future…

In its waltzier and wigglier moments, Post-War Preview has the oomph and sheen of Diamond Horseshoe entertainment at its brightest. The girls, as usual, are a splendid group. When the show goes in for a Victory Ball, offering four extremely fat ladies as “The Four Freedoms,” there is rather less to be said of it. Nor is there much to be said of the singing and dancing. There are other short specialties, of which some female contortionists and a dancer who lifts a pile of tables and chairs with his teeth are the most noteworthy.

Whatever its shortcomings, the thing has pace, color, and looks. At Diamond Horseshoe prices, it’s a good buy.


“YES SUH!,” Billy Banks & The Rhythmakers; Henry Allen; “Fats” Waller; Jimmy Lord; Pee-Wee Russell; Eddie Condon; Jack Bland; Al Morgan; Zutie Singleton; Billy Banks

Billy Rose’s new show in the late spring of 1943, at his Times Square Diamond Horseshoe venue, was called “Post-War Preview,” (“The Musical Shape of Things to Come”).

Weegee, the social documentarian, cannily captured the can-can girls…

“Post-War Preview” was in four or five parts: “The Night of Unconditional Surrender,” a post-war Broadway; “When Paris is Paree Again,” a post-war Paris; a post-war Vienna; the fourth part featured a post-war poet, Bob Hall; and the final “The Victory Ball” (in Washington) featured performers wearing masks of FDR, Churchill, Chiang Kai-shek, and Stalin, and an international cast.

It was a wildly successful, and well-reviewed, musical revue that played for over 10 months. Performances were at 8 PM and 12 AM; dinner from $3.50, (same buying power as $53.41 in April 2021).


“I’D DO ANYTHING FOR YOU (Haré cualquier cosa por ti)”, Rhythmakers; Billy Banks; Hill; Williams; Hopkins, 1932

Some of the performers included: Three Ross Sisters, Bob Hall, Herman Hyde, Billy Banks (died in Tokyo in 1967), Rosalie Grant, Vivien Fay, Four Rosebuds, Vincent Travers, and significantly Bobby Davis, (tap dances and “Puts one table on top of another and several chairs on top of the tables, leans down, takes a bite of the tables and lifts them up above his head with his teeth.” Brooklyn Eagle, June 1, 1943)


“A Message From the Man in the Moon,” Vincent Travers and His Orchestra; Buddy Blaisdell; Kahn; Jurmann, 1937

…There were no glasses, of course, on any of the girls last night. They are beautifully costumed in pink, blue and other colors, and Billy Rose told me that there wasn’t a single costume that cost him less than $360, which is considerable when you consider the amount of the gals that isn’t covered.

A radio announcer’s staccato voice starts the ‘Post-War Preview.”It is the Night of Unconditional Surrender and the announcer says that crowds in New York are dancing in the streets, 50,000 lights are aglow, and people are tearing up their ration cards into confetti… (The New York Post, June 1, 1943.)


The New York Post, May 28, 1943


“Tomorrow Is Another Day,” Vincent Travers and His Orchestra; Buddy Blaisdell; Kahn; Jurmann, 1937


“Woman Laughing (Continuous)”


PM, June 2, 1944 pp. 12-13 (photos by Weegee and Arthur Leipzig)

A Weegee Gets Attention At Museum of Modern Art

The big picture at lower right is the center of attraction in Weegee’s section of the Art in Progress photo exhibition now on view at the Museum of Modern Art. It shows Mrs. George Washington Kavanaugh and Lady Decies outside the Metropolitan Opera House – and the eloquent facial reaction of another woman. The other pictures on this page were snapped by Weegee as visitors to the photo exhibition looked at his pictures. Four out of his five exhibits have appeared in PM. The opera shot got the most laughs. Weegee reports.

Staten Island Girl Scouts Turn Farmerettes


Everybody’s Laughing, Teddy Wilson and his Orchestra; Billie Holiday; Lerner; Oakland, 1938

Art in Progress, May 24 – September 17, 1944.
(Three out of five photos appeared as news items; “I Cried…” was used in a photography column; “The Critic” made its debut in this article…)


Laughing At Life, Billie Holiday, 1940


Weegee, “Installation view of Weegee’s exhibition in Art in Progress, Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1944″ (Weegee’s World, p. 28)


Screenshot of checklist, moma.org


Laughing Boogie, Eddie Chamblee and The Band; Chamblee, 1951


Everyone’s Laughing, Clyde McPhatter, Winfield Scott, 1954


The Verdict Is In (And You’re Guilty), Shorty Long and the Santa Fe Rangers, 1948

Knadles is guilty...


Guilty, Wayne King and His Orchestra; Ernie Birchill; Kahn; Akst; Whiting, 1931


Guilty, Margaret Whiting; Jerry Gray; Akst; Kahn; Whiting, 1946


Guilty, Monica Lewis; The Chelsea Three; Kahn; Akst; Whiting, 1947


Guilty, Ella Fitzgerald; Eddie Heywood and His Orchestra; Eddie Heywood; Gus Gahn; Harry Akst; Richard A. Whiting, 1947


Guilty, Buddy DeVal; Don Grashey, 1955


“This is the bull’s-eye an air raider would head for…”


Dive Bombers (Zooming and Diving), 1960





PM, May 25, 1941

How N.Y. Prepares to Defend Itself From Bombers

Raids Wouldn’t Catch City Napping Though Nobody Is Sure What Would Happen to Skyscrapers or Where People Would Shelter

by Robert Rice…

Emergency Services Are Ready for Action


I’m Guilty, Lonnie Johnson, 1952

Newspaper PM, article about Murder Inc. member or associate
PM, May 23, 1941, p. 9

“Up From the Slums, or How Young Knadles Nitzberg Made His Nark” by John Kobler

PM newspaper, Weegee photo of kids on fire escape
PM, May 23, 1941, p. 23

Record of a New York Day

“The hot weather last night took Weegee, the photographer, to the Lower East Side, where he found these children sleeping on a tenement fire escape at Irving and Rivington Streets. Weegee says he gave the kids $2 for ice cream, but their father took charge of the dough.”

Weegee's book Naked City
Weegee, Naked City, pp. 22-23

Tenement Penthouse

But the other fire escape is somewhat overcrowded… its not so bad sleeping that way… except when it starts to rain… then it’s back to the stuffy tenement rooms.”

[$2 had the same buying power as $38.15 in April 2021.]


Tenement Symphony,” Larry Clinton’s Bluebird Orch.; Kuller; Golden; Borne; Peggy Mann and Butch Stone, 1941


PM, May 23, 1941, p. 13 (photo by Gene Badger)

A Hot-Weather Fashion Preview by the Dead End Kids
Scene: East River. Time 3 p.m. Temperature: 90.7.