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PM, December 26, 1940 pp.16-17

Quakers March on New York with placards urging that America feed Hitler’s victims…

Christmas Pudding for these wounded British soldiers was served a few days early – so that this picture, sent from England by ship nail, could get here on Christmas day…

A Hitler Greeting of holiday ill-will toward England is loaded under a German bombing plane…

Loose Locomotive without a crew ran down spur in Chicago…

Nazi Troops are stationed in key spots throughout Rumania…

Union Label is the name of this strip act…

President Roosevelt Takes His Family and Guests to Church on Christmas…

Trans-Atlantic Greetings… are broadcast by Mayor LaGuardia and Lily Pons…

American Refugees arrive on S.S. Washington from the Orient…

First Aid fails to revive Paul Ryan, killed by a gas explosion in his apartment at 865 First Ave. Police said it was apparently suicide. The Christmas night blast shook the 17-story building and injured two house employees. PM photo by Weegee

PM, December 26, 1940 pp.16-17

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865 First Ave., December 25 or 26, 2012


865 First Ave., December 26, 2020


PM, December 24, 1940


(Only six hours, and one time zone, seperates Weegee Creek, OH, and Santa Claus, IN…)


Weegee, Naked City, 1945, pp.158-159

Not so long ago I, too, used to walk on the Bowery, broke, “carrying the banner.” The sight of a bed with white sheets in a furniture store window, almost drove me crazy. God… a bed was the most desirable thing in the world.

In the summer I would sleep in Bryant Park… But when it got colder I transferred to the Municipal Lodging House… I saw this sign on the wall there. A Sadist must have put u=it up. I laughed to myself… what Cash and Valuables… I didn’t have a nickel to my name, but I was a Free Soul… with no responsibilities…

Slumber-time in a mission… it’s Christmas.


PM, December 23, 1940, p.1

Boy Meets Girl – and that’s no posed meeting as he came home last night on Christmas furlough with 5000 other soldiers. That’s not anguish you read in the face of the woman at the right. The Christmas package in her hand as she waits for her soldier is the tip-off. She too, is overcome with joy. (See page 15.) Photo by Weegee
PM, December 23, 1940, p.1

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PM, December 23, 1940, p15. PM photos by Weegee

Home For Christmas Are the Soldiers From Alabama.
For nearly seven hours wives, girl friends, mothers and fathers swarmed into Pennsylvania Station to greet 5000 men returning from Fort McClellan, Anniston, Ala., on Christmas furlough. The special sections ran far behind schedule but the festive spirit of the crowd overwhelmed any feeling of boredom at the delay. The off schedules were caused by heavy traffic on southern routes of other trains distributing the new trainees throughout the country for the holidays. Then, too, special stops had to be made to take aboard more drinking water and sandwiches. Here, part of the crowd waits.

Marie Buoragura of 69 Marcy Ave., Brooklyn, trusts that there are not too many soldiers named John but the signal, written in lipstick on a newspaper carries her message.

What their names are is not particularly important. The picture of Him meeting Her is eloquent enough in its bliss and perfect obliviousness to thousands of others who gave and received similar greetings at the station. The soldiers will remain here for none days, then entrain back to Alabama.
PM, December 23, 1940, p.15.

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Grand Central Station, December 23, 2012

…People swarmed Grand Central Station… the Apple store overwhelmed any feeling of boredom. (Weegee, a wartime photographer…) Here, part of the crowd walks, waits, and photographs…



Grand Central Station, December 24, 2020


PM, December 23, 1940

These Pictures Are PM’s Gift to You…
They are being given to readers who give PM Christmas gift subscriptions. Page 7 gives details.


Screen shots from Stanley Kubrick’s “Killer’s Kiss” (1955).


Screen shots from “Killer’s Kiss.” Mannequin factory owner, played by Skippy Adelman, and mannequins.


PM, October 1945. Photo by Skippy Adelman.


New York Age, May 1950. Photo by Skippy Adelman.



PM, 1945. Photo by Skippy Adelman.



Weegee-esque screen shots from “Killer’s Kiss.”


PM, October 1944. Talking dog for the war effort story. Photo by Skippy Adelman.


PM, August 31, 1941

Holiday Accidents took their toll as motorists started their Labor Day week end. Early yesterday Joseph Morris and his brother’s wife, Charlotte, were killed when his car overturned in Bronx Park. The driver, Anthony Morris, Navy purchasing agent, was overturned was injured. Three other auto deaths had been listed last night; the Motor Vehicle Bureau says about 40 will die before Tuesday7 in New York State. PM, August 31, 1941


PM, September 6, 1944, p. 16

“Take heed! New York will be bombed tomorrow!” Thus called Mrs. Elizabeth Lassen, 54, as she sat nude on the roof parapet of her apartment house at 1 W. 30th St., with her legs dangling over the edge. A neighbor induced her to leave her perch by offering her a cup of coffee. She drank the coffee and returned to the edge, but was coaxed back to safety by police who took her to Bellevue for observation . Neighbors said Mrs. Lassen had expressed concern over the safety of her husband a merchant ship caption who is at sea. PM, September 6, 1944, p. 16

And so the 24‐year‐old Parsons graduate decided to find a niche of his own. “I’ve always loved environmental fabrics,” he explained. “When I was a kid, I had swatches’ pinned all over my room.” The fabrics led to pillows and Mr. Carrieri opened his Pillow Salon at 1 West 30th Street last year. NY Times, May 18, 1968.

Living Amid Office Buildings With a Legend of Lillian Russell

George Washington never slept at 1 West 30th Street. That’s one fact accepted by the tenants of one of Manhattan’s most romantic and most improbable apartment houses.
NY Times, May 18, 1968.


WEEGEEWEEGEEWEEGEE, September 6, 2020

Fifth Avenue and Thirtieth Street Corner Sold for One Million Dollars — Deal for Grand Street Corner — Sales by Brokers and at Auction.

Frederick Fox Co. have sold the eight-story Wilbraham building at 284 Fifth Avenue, northwest corner of Thirtieth Street, opposite the Holland House. The structure, which covers a plot 40 by 125, was one of the first and finest bachelor apartment houses erected in the Fifth Avenue section, and was owned by Mrs. Emily H. Moir. NY Times, January 3, 1908.


PM, June 2, 1944, pp.12-13 (photos by Weegee and Arthur Leipzig)


Screenshot, moma.com, (photo by Ansel Adams)

(Just a name and a sliver of a silver gelatin print, “Woman Shot from Cannon, New York, 1943.”)


Screenshot from of exhibition checklist from moma.com

“My Man, 1941” – 95.1943 is online

“Tenement Fire, 1939” – 96.1943 is online

“Woman Shot from Cannon, New York, 1943” – 696.1943 is online

“Art in Progress: 15th Anniversary Exhibitions: Photography” at MoMA, May 24 – September 17, 1944

To be continued…


PM, May 31, 1943, p. 26 (Photo by Weegee)

“The can-can girls in the When Paris is Paree Again number of the new show at Billy Rose’s Diamond Horseshoe.”

Billy Rose Retreats Into the Future

By Louis Kronenberger

Having purveyed nostalgia and Gay-Ninetyish frou-frou at the Diamond Horseshoe for several years, Billy Rise about-faced Saturday night and marched into the future…
Whatever its shortcomings, the thing has pace, color, and looks. At Diamond Horseshoe prices, it’s a good buy.

Billy Rose’s new show in the late spring of 1943, at his Times Square Diamond Horseshoe venue, was called “Post-War Preview,” (“The Musical Shape of Things to Come”).

It was in four or five parts: “The Night of Unconditional Surrender,” a post-war Broadway; “When Paris is Paree Again,” a post-war Paris; a post-war Vienna; the fourth part featured a post-war poet, Bob Hall; and the final “The Victory Ball” (in Washington) featured performers wearing masks of FDR, Churchill, Chiang Kai-shek, and Stalin, and an international cast.

It was a wildly successful, and well-reviewed, musical revue that played for over 10 months. Performances were at 8 PM and 12 AM; dinner from $3.50, (same buying power as $51.28 in April 2020).

And most importantly, a review in PM featured an obscure, almost unknown, not-published-in-77-years Weegee photo… A good example of his seldom-seen, war-time, home-front work…

Some of the performers included: Three Ross Sisters, Bob Hall, Herman Hyde, Billy Banks (died in Tokyo in 1967), Rosalie Grant, Vivien Fay, Four Rosebuds, Vincent Travers, and significantly Bobby Davis, (tap dances and “Puts one table on top of another and several chairs on top of the tables, leans down, takes a bite of the tables and lifts them up above his head with his teeth.” Brooklyn Eagle, June 1, 1943)

…There were no glasses, of course, on any of the girls last night. They are beautifully costumed in pink, blue and other colors, and Billy Rose told me that there wasn’t a single costume that cost him less than $360, which is considerable when you consider the amount of the gals that isn’t covered.
A radio announcer’s staccato voice starts the ‘Post-War Preview.”It is the Night of Unconditional Surrender and the announcer says that crowds in New York are dancing in the streets, 50,000 lights are aglow, and people are tearing up their ration cards into confetti… (The New York Post, June 1, 1943.)


The New York Post, May 28, 1943


PM, May 28, 1941 (One Weegee photo made in Times Square)

World War Two (and Murder Inc. and bird) news… (Important day in the history of WWII and the U.S.)