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PM, June 7, 1944, p.20

The Face of New York on Invasion Day

The crowds in Times Square were serious yesterday – glad that D-Day had come and yet solemn at the thought of the boys in the fighting. Below you see some of the faces turned up toward the electric sign on the Times building as bulletins of Allied progress were flashed out. Photos by Weegee.


PM, June 7, 1944, p.20


“D-Day Polka,” Brunon Kryger “King of the Polkas” and his International Orchestra, 1945



Weegee, Naked City, 1945


PM, May 31, 1942, pp.8-9 (photo by Weegee)

Weegee, free-lance news photographer who drives around New York in search of pictures, got so many dirty looks during the first two weeks of gas rationing that he had a sign painter letter this card for the rack that used to hold his front license plate. Like one out of every 10 motorists in the East, Weegee has an X card.
PM, May 31, 1942, p.8


Extra! Weegee!, p. 19

Shrinking Violet Explains

New York – The envious looks of gasless former “Sunday Drivers” pierced the tender epidermis of “Weegee” noted New York freelance photographer as he toured the city while on the job today. To get rid of that uncomfortable feeling, “Weegee” mounted this explanation of gasoline expenditure on the front of his machine and immediately felt much better.
Credit Line (ACME) 5-24-42

Extra! Weegee!, p. 19


Screenshot, whitney.org


We’re the Sunday Drivers, Billy Murray’s Trio (Carl Mathieu, Monroe Silver and Murray), 1927


“Take It Slow and Easy,” Billy Banks’ Rhythmakers, Henry Allen, Pee-Wee Russell, Jow Sullivan, Eddie Condon, Jack Bland, Al Morgan, Zutty Singleton, Billy Banks, 1939


“The can-can girls in the When Paris is Paree Again number of the new show at Billy Rose’s Diamond Horseshoe.”
PM, May 31, 1943, p. 26 (Photo by Weegee)

Billy Rose Retreats Into the Future

By Louis Kronenberger

Having purveyed nostalgia and Gay-Ninetyish frou-frou at the Diamond Horseshoe for several years, Billy Rise about-faced Saturday night and marched into the future…

In its waltzier and wigglier moments, Post-War Preview has the oomph and sheen of Diamond Horseshoe entertainment at its brightest. The girls, as usual, are a splendid group. When the show goes in for a Victory Ball, offering four extremely fat ladies as “The Four Freedoms,” there is rather less to be said of it. Nor is there much to be said of the singing and dancing. There are other short specialties, of which some female contortionists and a dancer who lifts a pile of tables and chairs with his teeth are the most noteworthy.

Whatever its shortcomings, the thing has pace, color, and looks. At Diamond Horseshoe prices, it’s a good buy.


“YES SUH!,” Billy Banks & The Rhythmakers; Henry Allen; “Fats” Waller; Jimmy Lord; Pee-Wee Russell; Eddie Condon; Jack Bland; Al Morgan; Zutie Singleton; Billy Banks

Billy Rose’s new show in the late spring of 1943, at his Times Square Diamond Horseshoe venue, was called “Post-War Preview,” (“The Musical Shape of Things to Come”).

Weegee, the social documentarian, cannily captured the can-can girls…

“Post-War Preview” was in four or five parts: “The Night of Unconditional Surrender,” a post-war Broadway; “When Paris is Paree Again,” a post-war Paris; a post-war Vienna; the fourth part featured a post-war poet, Bob Hall; and the final “The Victory Ball” (in Washington) featured performers wearing masks of FDR, Churchill, Chiang Kai-shek, and Stalin, and an international cast.

It was a wildly successful, and well-reviewed, musical revue that played for over 10 months. Performances were at 8 PM and 12 AM; dinner from $3.50, (same buying power as $53.41 in April 2021).


“I’D DO ANYTHING FOR YOU (HarĂ© cualquier cosa por ti)”, Rhythmakers; Billy Banks; Hill; Williams; Hopkins, 1932

Some of the performers included: Three Ross Sisters, Bob Hall, Herman Hyde, Billy Banks (died in Tokyo in 1967), Rosalie Grant, Vivien Fay, Four Rosebuds, Vincent Travers, and significantly Bobby Davis, (tap dances and “Puts one table on top of another and several chairs on top of the tables, leans down, takes a bite of the tables and lifts them up above his head with his teeth.” Brooklyn Eagle, June 1, 1943)


“A Message From the Man in the Moon,” Vincent Travers and His Orchestra; Buddy Blaisdell; Kahn; Jurmann, 1937

…There were no glasses, of course, on any of the girls last night. They are beautifully costumed in pink, blue and other colors, and Billy Rose told me that there wasn’t a single costume that cost him less than $360, which is considerable when you consider the amount of the gals that isn’t covered.

A radio announcer’s staccato voice starts the ‘Post-War Preview.”It is the Night of Unconditional Surrender and the announcer says that crowds in New York are dancing in the streets, 50,000 lights are aglow, and people are tearing up their ration cards into confetti… (The New York Post, June 1, 1943.)


The New York Post, May 28, 1943


“Tomorrow Is Another Day,” Vincent Travers and His Orchestra; Buddy Blaisdell; Kahn; Jurmann, 1937


The Verdict Is In (And You’re Guilty), Shorty Long and the Santa Fe Rangers, 1948

Knadles is guilty...


Guilty, Wayne King and His Orchestra; Ernie Birchill; Kahn; Akst; Whiting, 1931


Guilty, Margaret Whiting; Jerry Gray; Akst; Kahn; Whiting, 1946


Guilty, Monica Lewis; The Chelsea Three; Kahn; Akst; Whiting, 1947


Guilty, Ella Fitzgerald; Eddie Heywood and His Orchestra; Eddie Heywood; Gus Gahn; Harry Akst; Richard A. Whiting, 1947


Guilty, Buddy DeVal; Don Grashey, 1955


“This is the bull’s-eye an air raider would head for…”


Dive Bombers (Zooming and Diving), 1960





PM, May 25, 1941

How N.Y. Prepares to Defend Itself From Bombers

Raids Wouldn’t Catch City Napping Though Nobody Is Sure What Would Happen to Skyscrapers or Where People Would Shelter

by Robert Rice…

Emergency Services Are Ready for Action


I’m Guilty, Lonnie Johnson, 1952

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PM, June 30, 1941 (74 years ago yesterday.)

The Record of a New York Day

A freak, mid-afternoon electrical storm came, went and left the city still hot and perspiring. The hottest temperature was 88 degrees, and, according to the Weather Bureau, it ought to be about the same today. A woman, Ida Bogart, 25, was killed yesterday at Nanuet Lake, N.J. when lightening struck a tree under which she had taken shelter.

Luckily for resorts, the rain was restricted mostly to the Bronx and Washington Heights. There wasn’t even a drizzle at Coney Island, which drew 1,000,000 visitors. Despite the heat, only 75,000 of Coney’s million went into the water. The remaining 925,000, however, found other forms of amusement.

ATTEMPTED HOLDUP: Just about a half-hour before this picture was taken, Michael Reilly, 23-year-old paroled convict, shown here with Patrolman Thomas Henry, was standing up. According to the police, Reilly, who still “owes” eight years at Danemora [Danemora! That’s a coincidence…] for a previous hold up, tried yesterday to hold up a bartender at a tavern at 750 Tenth Ave., near 54th Street. While Reilly brandished two guns, a patron slipped out and called patrolman Henry, attached to the 54th Street station. The policeman shot the bandit in the chest. Photo by Weegee

AID TO BRITAIN: A. Hitler’s Irish relatives, now in New York, are ganging up on him. The other day Adolf’s sister-in-law, Mrs. Brigid Hitler, the 49-year-old Dubliner who used to be married to der Fueherer’s half-brother, Alois, volunteered for service with the British War Relief. Yesterday William Patrick Hitler, 30, her son and Adolf’s nephew, got a good-by kiss from Brigid as he left for Canada to join the fight against his uncle. Photo by Weegee